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More Edgar Albert Guest Poems


The Temple – What Makes It Of Worth
Poem by Edgar Albert Guest

You may delve down to rock for your foundation piers,
You may go with your steel to the sky
You may purchase the best of the thought of the years,
And the finest of workmanship buy.
You may line with the rarest of marble each hall,
And with gold you may tint it; but then
It is only a building if it, after all,
Isn’t filled with the spirit of men.
You may put up a structure of brick and of stone,
Such as never was put up before;
Place there the costliest woods that are grown,
And carve every pillar and door.
You may fill it with splendors of quarry and mine,
With the glories of brush and of pen —
But it’s only a building, though ever so fine,
If it hasn’t the spirit of men.
You may build such structure that lightning can’t harm,
Or one that an earthquake can’t raze;
You may build it of granite, and boast that its charm
Shall last to the end of all days.
But you might as well never have builded at all,
Never cleared off the bog and the fen,
If, after it’s finished, its sheltering wall
Doesn’t stand for the spirit of men.
For it isn’t the marble, nor is it the stone
Nor is it the columns of steel,
By which is the worth of an edifice known;
But it’s something that’s living and real.

A Christmas Carol
Poem by Edgar Albert Guest

God bless you all this Christmas Day
And drive the cares and griefs away.
Oh, may the shining Bethlehem star
Which led the wise men from afar
Upon your heads, good sirs, still glow
To light the path that ye should go.
As God once blessed the stable grim
And made it radiant for Him;
As it was fit to shield His Son,
May thy roof be a holy one;
May all who come this house to share
Rest sweetly in His gracious care.
Within thy walls may peace abide,
The peace for which the Savior died.
Though humble be the rafters here,
Above them may the stars shine clear,
And in this home thou lovest well
May excellence of spirit dwell.
God bless you all this Christmas Day;
May Bethlehem’s star still light thy way
And guide thee to the perfect peace
When every fear and doubt shall cease.
And may thy home such glory know
As did the stable long ago.

He’s Taken Out His Papers
Poem by Edgar Albert Guest

He’s taken out his papers, an’ he’s just like you an’ me.
He’s sworn to love the Stars and Stripes an’ die for it, says he.
An’ he’s done with dukes an’ princes, an’ he’s done with kings an’ queens,
An’ he’s pledged himself to freedom, for he knows what freedom means.
He’s bought himself a bit of ground, an’, Lord, he’s proud an’ glad!
For in the land he came from that is what he never had.
Now his kids can beat his writin’, an’ they’re readin’ books, says he,
That the children in his country never get a chance to see.
He’s taken out his papers, an’ he’s prouder than a king:
‘It means a lot to me,’ says he, ‘just like the breath o’ spring,
For a new life lies before us; we’ve got hope an’ faith an’ cheer;
We can face the future bravely, an’ our kids don’t need to fear.’
He’s taken out his papers, an’ his step is light to-day,
For a load is off his shoulders an’ he treads an easier way;
An’ he’ll tell you, if you ask him, so that you can understand,
Just what freedom means to people who have known some other land.

The Path To Home
Poem by Edgar Albert Guest

THERE’S the mother at the doorway, and the children at the gate,
And the little parlor windows with the curtains white and straight.
There are shaggy asters blooming in the bed that lines the fence,
And the simplest of the blossoms seems of mighty consequence.
Oh, there isn’t any mansion underneath God’s starry dome
That can rest a weary pilgrim like the little place called home.
Men have sought for gold and silver; men have dreamed at night of fame;
In the heat of youth they’ve struggled for achievement’s honored name;
But the selfish crowns are tinsel, and their shining jewels paste,
And the wine of pomp and glory soon grows bitter to the taste.
For there’s never any laughter howsoever far you roam,
Like the laughter of the loved ones in the happiness of home.

The Common Joys
Poem by Edgar Albert Guest

THESE joys are free to all who live
The rich and poor, the great and low:
The charms which kindness has to give,
The smiles which friendship may bestow,
The honor of a well-spent life,
The glory of a purpose true,
High courage in the stress of strife,
And peace when every task is through.
Nor class nor caste nor race nor creed,
Nor greater might can take away
The splendor of an honest deed.
Who nobly serves from day to day
Shall walk the road of life with pride,
With friends who recognize his worth,
For never are these joys denied
Unto the humblest man on earth.
Not all may rise to world-wide fame,
Not all may gather fortune’s gold,
Not all life’s luxuries may claim;
In differing ways success is told.
But all may know the peace of mind
Which comes from service brave and true;
The poorest man can still be kind,
And nobly live till life is through.
These joys abound for one and all:
The pride of fearing no man’s scorn,
Of standing firm, where others fall,
Of bearing well what must be borne.
He that shall do an honest deed
Shall win an honest deed’s rewards;
For these, no matter race or creed,
Life unto every man affords.

Source: Poemhunter
https://www.poemhunter.com/

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